Where Hospitality meets Business

Focused on hospitality, tourism, business and hotel management.
César Ritz Colleges Switzerland: Your hotel school

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César Ritz Colleges Switzerland
Learn from the pioneer of luxury hospitality

Hospitality, tourism and business on 3 campuses in Switzerland: César Ritz Colleges is inspired by the pioneer of luxury hotels, Mr César Ritz.

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César Ritz Colleges Switzerland
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From Bachelor degree to Master programmes, all your hotel management studies in Switzerland with César Ritz Colleges! Based in Le Bouveret, Lucerne and Brig, right in the heart of Europe.

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César Ritz Colleges Switzerland
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Hotel management graduates hold prestigious jobs and positions around the globe. Our school will kick-start your successful career!

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César Ritz Colleges Switzerland
Learn From the Pioneer of Luxury Hospitality

Swiss hospitality traditions combined with a top business management education; this is your life as a student of César Ritz Colleges.

César Ritz Colleges Switzerland

Dual Degree: Bachelor of International Business in Hotel and Tourism Management

Bachelor of Arts in Hospitality Business Management (Washington State University)

Dual Bachelor's degree: 3-year overview

Discover an overview of the dual Bachelor's degree below in partnership with Washington State University. Contact us for our brochure with full course details or for any further information.

Bachelor Degree related pages:

Entry Requirements Dates & Deadlines
   
Application Procedure Fees

Bachelor of International Business in Hotel and Tourism Management in Switzerland
Bachelor of Arts in Hospitality Business Management in Switzerland
César Ritz Colleges Bachelor of International Business in Hotel and Tourism Management

Bachelor Degree

The programme of the Bachelor of International Business in Hotel and Tourism Management has a strong professional focus for students seeking a career in international hospitality and tourism management. Students combine practical courses and management subjects with the development of a personalized business plan in the final year. Qualifications have been designed to deliver an appropriate blend of skills and knowledge in academic disciplines, professional hospitality and tourism management and personal and social development.

The joint Bachelor programme in partnership with Washington State University offers students the fantastic opportunity to graduate with both a César Ritz Colleges Bachelor degree in Hotel and Tourism Management and a Washington State University Bachelor degree in Hospitality Business Management. From the first day at César Ritz Colleges, students will study for both the César Ritz Colleges and Washington State University Bachelor degree. 

The Bachelor of Arts in Hospitality Business Management is awarded by Washington State University (WSU) and requires students to achieve a minimum of 2.50 Cumulative Grade Point Average (CGPA) after Term 4 to apply for this qualification. The same CGPA is required at the end of Term 8 to be awarded the WSU degree. Those who do not have a 2.50 CGPA but are above the César Ritz pass grade will be awarded a Bachelor of International Business in Hotel and Tourism Management.

Year 1 - Le Bouveret or Lucerne Campus

Food and Beverage Management

Internship

Term 1 (11 weeks)

Term 2 (11 weeks)

Paid internship in Switzerland or worldwide (4-6 months)

César Ritz Colleges Certificate in Hotel and Restaurant Operations

Continue to

Year 2 - Le Bouveret or Lucerne Campus

Rooms Division and Hospitality Business

Internship

Term 3 (11 weeks)

Term 4 (11 weeks)

Term 5 (11 weeks)

Paid internship in Switzerland or worldwide (4-6 months)

Continue to

Year 3 - Brig Campus

International Business, Business Plan and Specialisations

Term 6 (11 weeks)

Term 7 (11 weeks)

Term 8 (11 weeks)

Swiss Higher Diploma in Hotel and Tourism Management

César Ritz Colleges Bachelor of International Business in Hotel and Tourism Management
Washington State University Bachelor of Arts in Hospitality Business Management

 

Year 1

Food and Beverage Management

Terms 1-2


Term 1 (11 weeks)

  • Introduction to Hospitality and Tourism Management
    • This course is designed to introduce students to the exciting and diverse field of hospitality providing an overview of the major industry segments and the interdependent relationships that exist between these segments and the tourism industry. Students also discover a wide range of diverse hospitality management career opportunities and explore the qualities and behaviours considered to be essential of managers within the hospitality industry.
  • Management Information Systems
    • This course is designed to introduce students to contemporary information systems and demonstrate how these systems are used throughout organisations. The focus is on the key components of information systems - people, software, hardware, data and telecommunications and how these components can be integrated and managed to create competitive advantage. Students also gain hands-on experience with several business applications. Topics such as the Internet, business data analysis and database management are covered and how the business software tools commonly applied in these domains are used. As a result, students obtain valuable information technology knowledge and skills for being successful in all areas of business.
  • Introduction to Nutrition and Food Science
    • In this course students examine the science of nutrition, hygiene and food safety as it relates to healthy eating and healthy lifestyles. Included for discussion are topics such as: purchasing for nutrition, retention of natural nutrients in food, dietary guidelines used in different countries, fats, carbohydrates, proteins, the health benefits of vitamins, minerals and phytochemicals for humans, healthy menu planning and balanced diet.
  • Public Speaking
    • This course focuses specifically on communication. It enables students to become effective and confident public speakers by exposing them to a variety of learning situations and tools. They have many opportunities to put all they acquire in the classroom into practice.
  • Introduction to Industry Experience
    • This course equips students with the necessary skills to succeed in the workplace. Students develop interview, job search and communication skills, build self-confidence and learn to comport themselves in a professional manner appropriate to hospitality industry standards. Students will be prepared to optimise their internships, in Switzerland or abroad, as well as to foster their future career advancement, development and self-improvement.
  • Food Service Theory and Practice
    • The theoretical course is designed to give an overview of the basic principles of the food production cycle, a cycle that incorporates not only the principles of safe and hygienic food production but also the relationship between food and the customer experience. The course aims to build on management theory gained in previous courses, particularly planning, organising, leading and controlling. These concepts should be used in kitchen production later during studies.
  • Language 1
    • Language courses are designed to introduce students to reading, writing and speaking, largely in preparation for internship placement. The goal of these courses is to develop a strong foundation for language study skills and cultural understanding. Activities are centred on the skills of speaking, listening comprehension, reading comprehension and writing.

 

Term 2 (11 weeks)

  • Food Service Studies and Operations
    • This course develops the theoretical and technical knowledge of service operations combined with practical skills in a fine-dining environment. This will enable the food and beverage operator to achieve a proficient standard for a range of service types and situations in the international hospitality industry. The course also examines the function of food and beverage service departments in relation to other hospitality operations departments.
  • Business Writing
    • Through research activities and assignments, students develop their critical thinking, research and written communication abilities. All students are assessed on the following criteria: critical thinking, reading, writing, rhetorical knowledge and awareness, information literacy and processes of writing.
    • They learn and practise prewriting strategies and research techniques. They learn to use and document sources correctly, in order to avoid plagiarism. Skills include proper quotation, summary, paraphrase, citation and bibliography construction following the APA (American Psychological Association) format. Other skills – syntax, grammar, word choice and style – will be addressed as needed on an on-going basis throughout the course. The final portfolio should contain one copy of each essay.
  • Wine and Beverage Management
    • This course explains and examines the making and service aspects of alcoholic, non-alcoholic beverages and the basic understanding of how a beverage department of a large hotel is organised. In addition, students learn about history, viniculture and viticulture geography, grape varieties, wine making techniques, the storing and service of wine and beverages and are exposed to wine appreciation in order to acquire the knowledge to recognise quality beverage and identify attributes that will allow customers appreciation.
  • Mathematics for Hospitality Business
    • In this course students learn a variety of mathematical concepts and procedures, and apply them to business and hospitality situations. Topics include: linear equations and inequalities; assorted matrix operations; solving systems of equations and inequalities using Gauss-Jordan and Simplex methods; counting and probability. The knowledge and skill sets learned in this course will be useful to students in their later studies and throughout their hospitality careers.
  • Language 2
    • Language courses are designed to introduce students to reading, writing and speaking, largely in preparation for internship. The goal of these courses is to develop a strong foundation for language study skills and cultural understanding. Activities are centred on the skills of speaking, listening comprehension, reading comprehension and writing.

 

Internship (4-6 months)

  • Practical Experience
    • Paid internship in the hospitality industry in Switzerland or worldwide

      Minimum monthly gross salary in Switzerland: CHF 2,172.‒

 

Year 2

Rooms Division and Hospitality Business

Terms 3-4-5


Term 3 (11 weeks)

  • Rooms Division Operations
    • This course is designed to provide students with an introduction to rooms division operations including front office and housekeeping. Emphasis will be placed on operations, coordination and communication within and between departments. The course will also give the students a clear picture of career opportunities in this division.
  • Roots of Contemporary Issues
    • This course is designed to introduce students to the increasingly complex and changing world by focusing on four themes:
      - Humans and the environment
      - Globalisation
      - Inequality
      - Diverse ways of thinking
  • Calculus for Hospitality Business
    • Calculus is the study of mathematics related to change and motion, both of them being a fundamental aspect of mater, life and society. Calculus focuses on limits, functions, derivatives, integrals and dynamical systems in continuous time and all of them are required to discover the laws of change and motion. As such, Calculus has many applications in science, economics, engineering and business studies and can solve problems for which algebra alone is insufficient.
  • Microeconomics
    • A solid understanding of the broad economic environment is a necessary prelude to successful management. This course analyses how economic systems function and how they relate to broad social realities. The course will seek to cover the fundamentals of economics, basic elements and applications of supply and demand, different market structures and reasons for and the nature of government intervention in the economy.
  • Financial Accounting
    • This course is designed to introduce accounting theory and the use of accounting as a financial information system. It includes economic data processing, financial statements, accounting cycle, principles of different types of business, hospitality operational analysis, as well as basic analysis of financial statements. It emphasises on:
      - The understanding of the importance of accounting system
      - The application of accounting information system to various types and sizes of business, particularly in hospitality industry
      - The preparation of financial statements
      - The importance of accounting knowledge in business management

 

Term 4 (11 weeks)

  • Hospitality and Tourism Law
    • This course is designed to provide students with the knowledge and understanding of the laws and regulations affecting the hospitality industry and to develop in students an awareness of how managers of today need to understand the law including the preventative measures available to avoid costly legal problems. The course will include an introduction to the law of contracts, torts, bailment and civil rights issues as it relates to the travel and tourism industry.
  • The Built Environment
    • The hospitality and tourism industries require excellent skills in stakeholder management: human resources, suppliers, financial companies and owners to name a few. This course aims to develop a student’s ability to deal with business and personal transactions, avoiding role incongruency and dealing with interpersonal conflict. Negotiation and mediation principles are addressed and practiced through a series of role plays.
  • Macroeconomics
    • Upon completion of this course, the student should understand and be familiar with how the economy operates in a market-oriented country, with the emphasis on government policy impacts.
  • Managerial Accounting
    • Particularly in hospitality industry, the emphasis of this course is on the uses of accounting data within an organisation by its managers. The course includes interpretation of financial statements, cost concepts, cost-volume-profit (CVP) analysis, profit planning, approaches to pricing, forecasting, internal control, operations budgeting, etc. It is designed to strengthen students’ ability to make better business decisions based on financial data, improve management skills and enhance critical thinking ability as it relates to financial data.
  • Cultural Diversity in Organisations
    • This course examines the nature and importance of diversity in the workplace. The course explores how changes in demography, legal regulations and social-psychological approaches to management affect the functioning of individuals and organisations. The course focuses on five broad areas:
      - Impact of demographic changes in the workplace
      - Legal perspectives on diversity in the workplace
      - Social-psychological perspectives on diversity in the workplace
      - Culture and interpersonal relations in the workplace
      - Managing diversity in the workplace

 

Term 5 (11 weeks)

  • Statistics
    • Statistics is the branch of mathematics that transforms numbers into useful information for decision makers. The ability to analyse figures and interpret the results is a key management skill. Statistics deals with the study of uncertainty and as such it collects, analyses, and presents data in a meaningful way so that decision-making is less uncertain and leads to better outcomes. Statistics helps the hospitality manager to make better sense of the world and make better business decisions.
  • International Politics
    • Upon completion of this unit, students shall be able to understand the historical and theoretical developments in the field of international politics, use critical thinking in analysing political events with a 360-degree perspective, analyse the social, economic and political challenges to the world community, understand the history of world power, the politics of global security and arms control, and understand international human rights.
  • Foodservice Systems and Control
    • This course offers the student a comprehensive understanding of contemporary food and beverage management from a systems management approach. Students learn basic control systems and concepts relating to the areas of food production, labour costs and other operating expenses, menu pricing and bar and beverage management principles. It also focuses on cost-volume-profit analyses. At the end of this course students are able to accomplish most cost functions that take place in a restaurant. Students also have the opportunity to practically apply their knowledge in a real-service environment and they learn how to plan and run shifts and how to train, instruct, lead, observe and evaluate food and beverage service staff.
  • Hospitality Business Ethics
    • Questions of professional ethics lend themselves to analysis from multiple perspectives and dimensions. For example, while individuals, in fact, make decisions, decision-making occurs in a context. In a work setting, decision-making occurs within the culture of a particular organisation, profession or field. On an individual basis, decisions can be analysed in relation to such things as theories of moral development and emotional intelligence as well as from the perspective of the development of critical thinking skills. Using case studies and contemporary issues, this course will examine professional ethics from such perspectives and dimensions.
  • Food Chemistry
    • A basic knowledge of chemistry is required to understand how handling and processing may affect food quality. This course uses fundamental chemical principles to give an understanding of food’s behaviour under the conditions encountered in the processing and catering industry. This course provides, through laboratory experiments, a practical illustration of general chemical principles and the behaviour of major food components under various conditions encountered in the food processing and catering industry. Chemical composition and characteristics of major food groups are also investigated.

 

Internship (4-6 months)

  • Practical Experience
    • Paid internship in the hospitality industry in Switzerland or worldwide

      Minimum monthly gross salary in Switzerland: CHF 2,172.‒

 

Swiss Higher Diploma Qualification

In order to complete the Swiss Higher Diploma qualification, students must complete one term (Term 6) at the César Ritz Brig Campus.

 

Year 3

International Business, Business Plan and Specialisations

Terms 6-7-8


Term 6 (11 weeks)

  • Principles of Management
    • This class is designed to introduce students to the functions, principles and core concepts of management. It will focus on the importance of improving organisation effectiveness and the individual skills required to successfully manage organisations.
  • Financial Management
    • Financial Management is based on information provided by the financial statements and introduces more analytical tools that help in the decision-making process. In particular, the issues of pricing, cost management, the cost-volume-profit approach to decision, capital budgeting and elements of feasibility studies are analysed and discussed during the lessons. The course is practically oriented, provides many examples and exercises from the hospitality sector and focuses both on the derivations and the computations of the relevant formula and on the interpretation of the numerical results. Group work among the students in the class is extensive in this course.
  • Hospitality Marketing
    • This course is designed to give students a broad exposure to the principles of marketing, from both a theoretical and managerial perspective. As an introductory course, its aim is to make all students (business and non-business majors) aware of the terminology, concepts, strategies and techniques that are part of the world of marketing.
  • Tourism in a Global Perspective
    • The course examines the social relations, cultural practices and economic realities animating tourism globally. The course aims to familiarise students with the interrelated historic, social, cultural and political foundations of tourism by engaging with recent scholarship in anthropology, sociology, cultural studies and tourism studies. This course examines issues such as: cultural sustainability, ecotourism, sex tourism, indigenous tourism, historical sites and nationalism, memorials, race and national identity and tourist economies. We explore these themes globally to see how they affect the range of practitioners from local tourist operators, to the natural environment and to those oppressed.
  • Business Planning Project 1
    • In this course students learn a rhetorical approach to producing technical and professional documents from proposal documents to technical research reports. While it is guided by the needs and practices of business and industry, this course promotes rhetorical approaches and ethical assessments and judgments. These approaches, assessments and judgments are part of an effort to move technical and professional writing to a position that encourages holistic thinking and ethical, sustainable practice as part and parcel of this kind of writing.

 

Qualification: Swiss Higher Diploma

Swiss Higher Diploma in Hotel and Tourism Management

 

Term 7 (11 weeks)

  • Career Management
    • This course is designed to equip students with all of the necessary tools to be competitive when seeking employment. Emphasis will also be placed on developing skills to understand and advance within the workplace. In addition, students will learn a variety of leadership, management and decision-making strategies.
  • Human Resource Management
    • Human Resource Management is a key source of competitive advantage for organisations. This course provides you with current, research-based knowledge in how to best select, train, evaluate and develop employees and help students develop the skills necessary to critically evaluate human resource practices. The effects of social, legal, technological and other environmental changes on human resources are addressed. Course topics are relevant for jobs both in human resources and in all types of functional areas and organisations.
  • Operational Analysis
    • This course presents yield/revenue management and managerial accounting concepts and explains how they apply to specific operations within the hospitality industry. It is designed to improve students' critical thinking, skills relative to hospitality financial management and assist students to understand, analyse, synthesise and communicate financial information obtained from common financial statements and other sources.
  • Service Operations Management
    • Service businesses are an increasingly dominant force in world economics. Approximately 79% of our labour force, 76% of the GDP (gross domestic product), 45% of the average American family’s budget and 32% of all U.S. exports are accounted for by services. This course explores the operational characteristics of service companies. For example, service firms are far more people-oriented because of their direct interactions with customers. Customers are demanding and generally participate in the service process. The fluctuation of business demand presents a challenge to service operations managers who must use the perishable service capacity effectively. The intent of this course is to provide students with the concepts and tools necessary to manage a service operation effectively in a challenging business environment. The course is also designed to provide entrepreneurially inclined students with the foundation to open their own service businesses.
  • Elective
    • See table on elective options at the bottom of the page.
  • Business Planning Project 2
    • This course is a practical approach to business plan development. Students learn business idea generation strategies; analytical procedures, business plan components, financial planning requirements and improve presentation skills. The course is designed around a team-based approach to business plan evaluation, development and investment quality presentation.

 

Term 8 (11 weeks)

  • Economics and Public Policy
    • This course continues from the introductory Microeconomics with the introduction of new concepts and going into more depth in some of the already known microeconomic concepts. It starts with the role of the prices as the main allocation mechanism in the market system and continues with the theory of the consumer and the producer. In turn, it deals with the market forms and ends with the market failure and discusses how government intervention can optimise the functioning of the market mechanism.
  • Social Psychology of Hospitality
    • This course provides an introduction to the field of social psychology. Social psychology is the study of the nature and causes of individual behaviour, emotions and thought in social situations. Principles of social psychology affect many aspects of the everyday lives. For example, the psychology of interpersonal/romantic relationships, court cases, prejudice, aggression and many more topics will be studied. Social psychology can be applied to many other branches of psychology, such as clinical/counselling psychology, industrial/organisational psychology, personality theory, developmental psychology and cognitive psychology.
  • Hospitality Leadership and Organisational Behaviour
    • The service industry, which entails hospitality, is the largest on the planet. It employs more people than any other and represents trillions of revenue dollars. Owing to the considerable human element of service, this industry also requires extraordinary leadership and management. To this end, this course provides students with a comprehensive understanding of the key leadership and management issues that students may face during their career. Specifically, core areas such as interpersonal skills and group dynamics are covered. These are discussed within a variety of frameworks. Moreover, recurring themes will include entrepreneurship, ethics, team building, and personal and corporate ethos. Finally, through integrating theory and current practices, this course will help students build their base of management knowledge and enhance their potential to leverage human capital in the workplace.
  • Strategic Hospitality Management: Case Studies and Research
    • This course is designed to help students develop analytical and critical thinking skills by providing a project environment through which students practise and integrate skills and knowledge they have learned throughout their Hospitality Business Management degree programme. This course is specifically designed to help students to develop problem identification, problem prioritising and problem-solving skills; specifically the development of skills to understand and apply the cause and effect relationships between performance measures (effects) and their causes.
  • Elective
    • See table on elective options at the bottom of the page.
  • Business Planning Project 3
    • This course is a practical approach to business plan development, new business funding and new business planning and start-up. Students learn business plan components, analytical procedures, financial planning requirements and improve presentation skills. The course is designed around a team-based approach to business plan development, financial modelling, development milestones and new business start-up.

 

Electives

International Business

  • International Business
  • Global E-Commerce
  • Revenue Management
  • Marketing Strategy and Development
  • Destination Marketing

Business Start-Up

  • Entrepreneurship: Starting your Own Business
  • The Art of Business Negotiation
  

Culinary Trends in partnership with the
Culinary Arts Academy Switzerland

  • Food Media
  • Culinary Trends and Gastronomy
  • Advanced Wine and Beverage Management

Tourism and Sustainability
Management

  • Contemporary Issues in International Tourism
  • Sustainable Tourism Ventures
  • Strategic Tourism Management

 

Electives may vary each term and are subject to availability.

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